Blurring Gender Boundaries and the New Worlds of Work and Care

Blurring Gender Boundaries and the New Worlds of Work and Care

Taking Silicon Valley and other settings that exemplify the “new economy,” this project is investigating the new worlds of work and care.  As the 21st century economy continues to erode the institutional underpinnings of stable jobs and families, women and men alike face new dilemmas about how to trade off self-development with the care of others.  […]

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Listening to Lives: Theory and Method in Depth Interviewing

Listening to Lives: Theory and Method in Depth Interviewing

with Sarah A. Damaske Drawing on years of experience in the field, I am teaming with Sarah Damaske to write a book that outlines the theory and method of in-depth interviewing, while also providing a “how to” guide for novices and experienced researchers alike.

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Does It Take a Village or a Family? Explaining the Life Paths of Working Class Youth

Does It Take a Village or a Family?  Explaining the Life Paths of Working Class Youth

with Sarah A. Damaske How can we reconcile ethnographic studies that explain how families and neighborhoods transmit group inequality to new generations with studies that document the acquisition of cultural capital and the substantial diversity among children who share similar backgrounds? To unravel this paradox, this project is examining the variety of pathways that children […]

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Understanding Attitudes Toward the Employment of Mothers and Fathers: A Vignette Approach

Understanding Attitudes Toward the Employment of Mothers and Fathers:  A Vignette Approach

(with Jerry A. Jacobs) This project aims to improve and expand our understanding of public views toward mothers and fathers by using vignettes to vary the circumstances of married mothers’ and fathers’ employment. We are exploring whether and how people’s views on employed mothers, both married and single, and married fathers change when particular features […]

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